CAN AM SPYDER PARTS SHOP

The year is 2030 and Personal Flying Apparatus (PFAs, also known as jet packs) are the latest rage within both the personal travel and recreational products industries. The compact set-up stylishly attaches to your back and allows you to fly through the sky at speeds in excess of 100 mph, delivering you to your destination quickly, safely, and most importantly, enjoyably.
Article reproduced with the kind permission of Motorcycle USA

Although it hasn’t been invented, if there were a company to mass produce such a contraption, it would be Bombardier Recreational Products (BRP). Take a look at its CV, proof that this innovative Canadian company knows a thing or two about building “The Next Best Thing” when it comes to motorized consumer products. First, it started with its Ski-Doo snowmobiles, later expanding to the water with its Sea-Doo watercraft. They made the jump to the off-road world with its Can-Am ATVs, and, in 2008 moved to pavement with its tricycle, the Can-Am Spyder. Next year it expands its road line-up by offering a touring capable vehicle in the form of its 2010 Can-Am Spyder RT

Is it a Car or Motorcycle?

A little bit of both, actually. Based off the aforementioned Spyder platform, the RT (Roadster Touring) incorporates both automotive and motorcycle-derived engineering practices making it a unique touring option unlike anything else currently on the road. The first thing you’ll notice, next to its three wheels, is the way they’re arranged—two in the front, one in the back—an interesting contrast to conventional trikes (if you can call them that) based off Harley-Davidson Electra Glides and Honda Goldwings. Its streamlined shape resembles that of a modern European car, complete with twin projectile headlights, turn signals integrated in the rearview mirrors, and bright, highly visible LED taillights. More automotive similarities come in the form of its front double-A arm suspension, Bosch Vehicle Stability System (VSS), optional semi-automatic transmission, linked hydraulic brake system, and sophisticated instrumentation.

Like the Spyder, which it is based off, the RT uses a liquid-cooled 998cc V-Twin engine that you perhaps may have experienced aboard the Aprilia RSV1000R or Aprilia Tuono 1000R motorcycle. It was selected for a number of reasons, one of which is that it’s built by BRP’s sister company, Rotax. The engine features a compact 60-degree cylinder cant, 97 x 68mm bore/stroke dimensions, a 12.2: 1 compression ratio, and 4-valve DOHC equipped cylinder heads. Both its fuel and ignition maps were specifically calibrated for the rigors of the RT and a ride-by-wire throttle control system (in which the engine and the throttle are linked electronically as opposed to a conventional mechanical set-up), completes the package.

Two transmission systems are available (both of which feature reverse), the standard being a manual 5-speed controlled via a shift lever near the rider’s left foot and a left-hand operated hydraulic clutch. An optional semi-automatic gearbox does away with the clutch lever and moves the gear change process to the handlebar. Power is transferred to the 15-inch rear wheel via maintenance-free belt final drive.

Chassis

The engine is mounted behind the front wheels in the center of the machine inside Can-Am’s proprietary Surrounding Spar Technology (SST) frame. Constructed from steel, the Y-shaped frame extends back to a steel double-sided swingarm located underneath its 6.6-gallon fuel cell. Suspension is comprised of an automotive-derived double-A arm set-up with an integrated roll-bar. An electronically controlled power steering system is also fitted and provides variable assist. Front damping is courtesy of twin gas-charged shock absorbers, while a solo hydraulic shock absorber is used rearward. The suspension offers 5.67-inches of travel at each end. The Audio and Convenience package as well as the RT-S model offer 5-way preload adjustment via a push of a button.

It rolls on a pair of 14x5-inch aluminum wheels up front and a 15x7-inch aluminum rim out back all shod in Kenda rubber (165/65R14 front, 225/50R15 rear). Braking duties are handled by three rotors measuring 250mm in diameter and 6mm thick, controlled by twin 4-piston calipers up front and a single-piston caliper out back. The entire system is linked together hydraulically with electronic anti-lock system (ABS) and is actuated via a right-hand side foot lever. It also features an electronically activated parking brake.

Electronics

In addition to ABS, the Spyder employs a high-end and fully integrated VSS. Individual wheel speed sensors provide system with real-time speed data and help mitigate the chance of the rider losing control during acceleration, turning and braking. When system detects an abnormal wheel speed parameter it first reduces engine power, and if that isn’t sufficient, it will apply the brake to any or all off the three wheels until the speed value returns within range. The system is always on whenever the ignition switch is turned on, and, unlike most cars it cannot be manually disabled.

A full-color instrument display situated between the analog-style speedometer and tachometer provides the rider with information including speed, time, temperature, and trip info, as well as system malfunction alerts. Additionally, the rider can also set language, time, and unit of measurement preferences. Audiophiles will rejoice as the Spyder also includes an AM/FM/XM/WB/CB radio as well as an intercom feature that allows the rider and passenger to communicate. An iPod adapter is also available. All of its features can be accessed via a 4-button pad on the left-hand side of the handlebar. Further electronic creature comforts in the form of heated rider and passenger hand grips, cruise control and an up/down adjustment of the windscreen are also standard. Last of all, it comes with a Garmin Zumo GPS mounting adapter on the center of the handlebar.

Three Wheel Motion

Hop onto its plush saddle and it feels like you’re inside a car only there aren’t any doors or windows to isolate you from the outside world. Grab a hold of its clean V-shaped handlebar and you’ll notice just how close it is in relation to your torso, a real plus for riders of smaller stature. Place your feet on the footpegs and forget about the balancing act typical with a two-wheeler.

The controls are laid out similarly to a motorcycle with the twist-tube throttle located on the right-hand side of the handlebar, as is the engine run switch and starter button. Noticeably absent is a motorcycles traditional front brake lever which has been relocated to a right-hand-side foot lever. Working the turn signals, horn and headlight high-beam is all controlled on the bars left-hand side.

Starting the engine consists of first turning the key switch to ‘on’, flip the engine switch to ‘run’, depress the mode button on the handlebar, pull in the clutch lever (those who have the semi-auto transmission auto skip this step, however, we tested the standard model), and press the starter button. The engine fires right up. Notch the bike down into first gear with your left foot, fan out the clutch and you’re off and running.

First gear is pretty low which makes launching from a dead stop easy regardless if you’re on flat ground or slight incline. Twist the throttle and you’ll be surprised how much ‘oomph its V-Twin engine has. It’s truly amazing how different this engine feels than when used in Aprilia’s sportbikes, due in part to its touring-specific engine fueling and ignition mapping. Specifically its bottom and mid-range are plump enough that you’re never really going to need to rev it out to its 9000 rpm redline. Power comes on smooth and is devoid of any quirky fueling hiccups or power surges; just a smooth, steady flow of power throughout the rev range. Sure, you’re not going to win any drag races against any modern 250cc-plus motorcycles, but it gets up to speed well.

During acceleration, the engine emits the same charismatic tune as on Aprilia’s Rotax-engine equipped sportbikes, only in the Spyder it’s slightly more muted. Most sport-oriented riders will appreciate its sound; however for a hardcore touring type, it might still be too loud. While some might complain about the amount of engine noise while riding, you’ll be hard pressed to find someone who isn’t impressed by how just how little vibration there is. Equally as pleasing is the way in which the gearbox moves through each of its five gears. Each gear change has a very positive feel and doesn’t have any stickiness as we’ve experienced on other machines equipped with this engine. The gear ratios are spaced nicely and there’s never a time you feel between gears. Cruising down the freeway at 60 mph, the tachometer shows just a hair above 4000 rpm in top gear.

Our machine was fitted with the optional adjustable electric windshield and it did a phenomenal job of protecting us from the elements. Our only gripe was that it didn’t come down low enough for us to get a taste of fresh-air the few times we wanted it. The rearview mirrors offered a clear view of what was happening behind us and for the most part the instrumentation is easy to read. However, the font within the LCD display is too small and it’s difficult to read it even for someone with perfect vision. We also would have preferred if the analog-style gauges were ditched and integrated digitally into a larger LCD screen.

The rider can navigate through the audio and trip information functions via the 4-button control pad on the left-side of the handlebar. The menu system is straight forward and easy to figure out but we weren’t all that impressed by the outright sound quality coming out of its speakers. We didn’t get a chance to play with the cruise control at all as it didn’t function on our machine.

For a motorcyclist, one of the oddest sensations you experience aboard the Spyder is during cornering. As opposed to a motorcycle, in which you counter-steer to initiate a turn, the Spyder requires you to do the opposite. If you’ve ever ridden an ATV, snowmobile, or a Jet Ski, than you’ll be familiar with the way it feels when you turn, and, if you’ve never touched a motorcycle you’ll probably have an easier time acclimating to its turning manners (old habits are hard to break). Nonetheless, its power steering system makes maneuvering the Spyder easy regardless of speed, or even upper body strength. Just a light touch of the handlebars is all it takes for it to change direction.

On the highway the Spyder occupies approximately two-thirds of the traffic lane which gives you a fair amount of room inside your lane. The front wheels have a tendency to follow the road’s camber, further reducing steering effort, thereby making the ride more ‘hands-off’ when you’re racking up the miles on the highway.

We were also impressed by just how effective its suspension was at absorbing bumps on the road. Not only does it have almost zero bump-steer, its independent front suspension sucks up rough in a similar manner as a long wheelbase luxury car, no joke. We even purposely rode on rippled pavement on the shoulder which had little effect on the overall ride quality.

But its supple suspension manners do come at a cost, the cost being measured in firmness and its resistance to wallowing during aggressive acceleration and braking. During heavy braking or in situations like a panic stop, the chassis had a tendency to transfer weight from back-to-front way too fast, thereby upsetting the chassis and making the machine difficult to control. Our fully-loaded RT-S machine came with the electronically adjustable suspension which made a huge difference when set to full hard, but still wasn’t firm enough to eliminate its aggressive weight transfer. One pleasing side effect we noticed was how even with the suspension set to full-hard, the outright quality of the ride wasn’t compromised.

Traditional 3-wheeled vehicles aren’t known for having the best ground hugging stability. The Spyder smashes this conception with its VSS. Simply put, it’s one of the most effective systems we’ve used whether on two or four wheels. Its ABS function works great during braking with minimal noise and pedal pulsing, thereby ensuring a quick stop. Similarly, its rear wheel traction control keeps your inner hooligan in-check yet still allows you to do a burn-out. And its lateral stability control function takes the worry out of aggressive or panic steering inputs. We even tried to get it up on two wheels but the stability control makes it virtually impossible.

One of my favorite features on the Spyder RT is its sheer amount of cargo capacity. There are a total of five storage areas (hood, trunk, right/left side hard cases, and small cockpit glove box) that allow you to tote a tremendous amount of gear with you. Even better is the optional Spyder RT travel luggage (with roller wheels and handle) that neatly fits right into the compartment allowing for seamless luggage removal when you arrive at your destination. And for those who literally want to bring their kitchen sink with them, Can-am offers a pull-behind trailer with a whopping 164-gallon capacity. It’s so big that I could literally sleep in it! The trailer features independent coil-over suspension, aluminum wheels, carpet, interior lighting and separate front and rear lid access. Furthermore the trailer is set-up to work in conjunction with its VSS and can be color-matched to your Spyder.

 

CAN AM SPYDER SILVER
spyder silver
CAN AM SPYDER RED
canam spyder
 

Can Am Spyder Roadster Technology

Introducing the BRP Can Am Spyder Roadster, slamming together the stylings of both a high end sports car and the manoeuvrability of a sports bike together for the most breathtaking and astonishing ride you will ever experience, prepare to be blown away by the stunning power of the Spyder!

With its unique Y-architecture body frame, and its unorthodox layout comprising of 2 front wheels and a singular rear wheel, accompanied by the seating position of your typical racing motorbike, you will feel right at home perched upon this marvel of modern technology and frightening power. The Can Am Spyder rides on a steel spine and sports car suspension, making it lightweight, yet tough.

Under the hood you can find the Rotax V990 engine, fed with a smooth five speed gearbox in either a sequential manual or an automatic option, and final belt drive delivering a powerful and astonishingly smooth driving experience.

Accompanying the pure power of this machine is a range of sophisticated safety and stability systems. These allow the Can AmSpyder to detect everything from a slipping wheel to engine performance. These ECU’s are:

  • DPS - Dynamic Power Steering
  • VSS - Vehicle Stability System
  • DESS - Digitally Encoded Security System
  • EFI - Electronic Fuel Injection

And bringing all these together is the Command Centre Interface. This multi function gauge provides an overview of all the integrated critical functions. The user friendly display allows you to choose exactly what information you wish to view. This unit also has a comprehensive diagnostics centre integrated into it, allowing you to troubleshoot any problems yourself from the comfort of the front seat. Information can either be displayed in metric measurements or U.S Standard measurements.

You will also find in the dashboard area a dual analogue LCD display with integrated tachometer, an electric fuel gauge, making sure you never forget to fill up, daily trip meters, a visual representation of the engine temperature, as well as a handy gear position indicator.

The Can Am Spyder comes in two stunning colours, the vibrant millennium Yellow to ensure this machine is a real head turner, or you can go for the full moon finish, whilst not as vibrant as the yellow, still makes a statement with unrelenting style.

There is also a wide range optional extras to choose from, these are:

  • Fog Lights
  • Xenon Lights
  • Mono Seat Cover
  • Racing Exhaust Pipe
  • Travel Bags
  • Cargo Liner
  • Passenger Backrest
  • Low and high windshields.

With all these extras and more, you can customise the Spyder to suit your exact needs, making it a versatile machine as well as a fantastic riding experience.

The Spyder also comes with a 2 year Warranty for ultimate peace of mind.

SM5 Silver £12929.00,
SM5 Yellow £13279.00
SE5 Silver £14229.00
SE5 Yellow £14579.00
SE5 Red £14579.00
on the road.
 

CAN AM SPYDER SPECIFICATIONS

/ Engine /
Manufacturer................................BRP-Rotax
Type..............................................990 V-Twin
Displacement...............................60.90 in3 (998cc)
Bore..............................................3.82 in (97 mm)
Stroke...........................................2.68 in (68 mm)
Cylinder........................................2
Valves per cylinder.......................DOHC 4
Max output...................................106 hp @ 8500 rpm
(79 kW @ 8500 rpm)
Max torque...................................77 lb-ft @ 6250 rpm
(104.3 Nm @ 6250 rpm)
Compression ratio........................10.8:1
Ignition type.................................Electronic ignition with
dual output coil
Lubrication....................................5W40 BRP synthetic oil
Exhaust system.............................2-into-1 with catalytic converter
Cooling.........................................Liquid cooled
Injection........................................Multi-point EFI with 57 mm
diameter throttle bodies

/ Drive Train /
Gear box......................................Sequential Manual 5-Speed (SM5)
with transmission-based reverse
Optional gear box........................Sequential Electronic 5-Speed (SE5)
with transmission-based reverse
Final drive.....................................28/79 ratio final drive with
Carbon-reinforced drive belt
Clutch...........................................Wet, multi-plate, manual or electronic
operation through a hydraulic piston

/ Electric Equipment /
Magneto.......................................500 Watt
Starter...........................................Electric
Battery..........................................Dry Cell, 12V, 21 Amp

/ Geometry /
Front suspension..........................Double A-Arm with anti-roll bar
Front suspension travel................5.67 in (144 mm) with adjustable cam
Rear suspension...........................Swing-arm with monoshock
Rear suspension travel.................5.71 in (145 mm) with adjustable cam
Chassis type.................................SST Spyder
(Surrounding Spar Technology)
Steering........................................DPS (Dynamic Power Steering)

/ Tires & Wheels /
Front tire.......................................KR21 165/65R14
Front nominal pressure................13-17 psi (89-117 kPa)
Rear tire........................................KR21 225/50R15
Rear nominal pressure..................26-30 psi (179-207 kPa)
Wheel size, front...........................Aluminum 14x5 (355x127)
Wheel size, rear............................Aluminum 15x7 (381x178)

 

 

 

 

 

 

/ Brakes /
Type..........................................Foot-actuated, fully integrated
hydraulic 3-wheel braking system
Front braking system................4 piston calipers with 10.2 in x 0.25 in
(260 mm x 6 mm) discs
Rear braking system.................Single-piston caliper with 10.2 in x 0.25 in
(260 mm x 6 mm) disc
EBD..........................................Electronic Brake Distribution
ABS...........................................Anti-lock Braking System
Parking brake...........................Mechanical, foot actuated to the
rear caliper

/ Safety & Security /
VSS...........................................Vehicle Stability System
ABS...........................................Anti-lock Braking System
TCS...........................................Traction Control System
SCS...........................................Stability Control System with
Roll-Over Mitigation
DPS...........................................Dynamic Power Steering
DESS.........................................Digitally Encoded Security System

/ Vehicle Dimensions & Weights /
Dry vehicle weight....................697 lbs (316 kg)
Front storage capacity.............2,685 in3 (44 l)
Front max load capacity...........30 lbs (15.9 kg)
Total vehicle load allowed........440 lbs (200 kg)
Fuel capacity............................6.6 US gal (25 l)
Oil capacity..............................1.19 US gal (4.5 l)
Coolant capacity......................0.85 US gal (3.2 l)
GVWR.......................................1,188 lbs (540 kg)
Ground clearance.....................4.5 in (115 mm)
Vehicle overall height...............45.1 in (1,145 mm)
Vehicle overall length...............105 in (2,667 mm)
Vehicle overall width................59.3 in (1,506 mm)
Seat (top) height.......................29 in (737 mm)
Wheel base..............................68 in (1,727 mm)
Wheel track, front.....................51.5 in (1,308 mm)
Type of gas...............................Unleaded, 87 octane minimum

/ Features & Main Options /
Color choices...........................Full Moon
Millennium Yellow
Roadster Red
Instrumentation........................Dual analog and LCD w/speedometer,
tachometer, electric fuel gauge,
daily trip (A & B) meters, engine
temperature, ambient temperature
and gear position indicator. Information
displayed in either metric or US Standards
Main options............................Fog lights, xenon lights,
mono seat cover, racing exhaust pipe,
travel bags, cargo liner, passenger
backrest, low and high windshields
Warranty...................................2 years

 

CAN AM SPYDER ROADSTER

THE ALL NEW BRP CAN AM SPYDER A COMPLETELY NEW FORM OF PERSONEL TRANSPORT THE CAN AM SPYDER IS BRP 'S LATEST PRODUCT IN THE LEISURE MARKET.

CAN AM SPYDERS AVAILABLE SHORTLY IN THE UK

ALONG WITH A FULL RANGE OF CAN AM SPYDER PARTS AND CAN AM ACCESSORIES

 

2009 Can-Am Spyder SE5 First Ride



Article reproduced with the kind permission of
Tim Clark

 

It was February 2007 in San Diego when BRP first introduced the Can-Am Spyder, a hi-tech, three-wheeled vehicle with a bit of a twist - two wheels in the front, one in the rear. For decades, custom three-wheeled trikes have been available with powerplants ranging anywhere from Harley-Davidson Twins to small block V-8s, but these trikes have always sported a single front wheel with two trailing and a reputation for not being the best handling machines. Enter the Can-Am Spyder, a revolutionary direction for three-wheeled transportation.

In an effort to not be categorized with these previous triple-tire vehicles the folks from BRP/Can-Am prefer the Spyder be classified under the term Roadster. Now, the question is, should the Spyder Roadster be classified as a motorcycle?

It doesn't take but a few miles in the cockpit of this testosterone-laden chariot to quickly realize that the characteristics of two-wheeled motorcycles are not apparent. Yes, the Can Am Spyder sports a pair of handlebars, and yes, there is a twist throttle - but after that you'll find the Spyder Roadster to be in a class of its own. Previous articles have claimed that the riding experience falls somewhere between a motorcycle and a convertible sports car; I would say it's more like a cross between an ATV and a snowmobile - but with asphalt underneath you.

Back to the Spyder Roadster... We were invited to Dallas, Texas, to test the 2009 version, which is virtually identical to the 2008 model, except this time the SE5 Spyder model was available. Can-Am was anxious to show-off their latest techno advancement - one which they felt would help the Spyder appeal to an even broader base of enthusiasts.

The SE5 Sequential Electronic Five-Speed is a semi-automatic transmission shifted via your left thumb and forefinger, similar to the Yamaha FJR1300AE. The SE5 version has no shift or clutch lever and takes only a few minutes to understand the simplicity of how it works.

The amazing feature of the Spyder SE5 is not only how it up-shifts through the five speeds but how it automatically downshifts for you. Once the engine trickles down to the 2500 rpm range, the SE5 automatically starts grabbing gears and by the time you reach that stop sign, you are already in first. Call me lazy, but I found this to be a great feature... You can also manually downshift by easily pulling in on the shift paddle with your forefinger.

No matter how you describe the riding experience, the one word that keeps surfacing to the top is "fun." Plus amazing, unreal, incredible, awesome and a whole slew of positive adjectives. Bottom line is the Can-Am Spyder Roadster is an absolute kick-in-the-butt to ride. Here are some of the reasons why:

Where's The Power Come From?

If you own an engine company that already has global recognition for building hi-tech performance and reliable powerplants, why not start there. The Can-Am Spyder runs a variation of the Rotax V-Twin found in the Aprilia sportbikes. This is a liquid-cooled 998cc V-Twin with multi-port, electronic fuel-injected 57mm throttle bodies, which Can-Am claims produces 106 hp at 8500 rpm with an impressive 77 lb-ft of torque at 6250 rpm.

Can-Am also claims the Spyder accelerate from 0-60 in 4.5 seconds.and is governed to a top speed of 110mph.This is the same basic engine found in the superbike series and they pump out 200hp ,so there's something for the very brave to play with.

My experience was in the pouring rain on a Texas freeway at 85 mph with plenty of throttle left to easily surpass the 100 mph mark. Overall the engine feels very strong throughout the entire band. Both the electronic and manual shift easily glide through the five-speed gearbox with a solid performance and plenty of power.

The exhaust is a 2-into-1 system that amplifies a substantial but subdued sound without much limitation on the performance. Can-Am does have an alternative slip-on exhaust that pumps up the horsepower another 4 ponies and kicks out a classic sound for those looking for a little edgier appearance and performance.

One "Big Fun" feature that the BRP designers put into the Spyder's performance package is the Burn Out factor. Drop the clutch from a standing start and the Rotax 990 will light up the rear tire... And not just for a few feet... I'm talking 30-40 feet! Anytime under 35 mph, feather that clutch and grab some throttle and you have black streaks trailing behind you. I'm convinced it is designed to sell more rear tires, but who cares! If you're 20 or 60, it's always fun to light up the rear.


Getting In Gear

We already touched on the Cam Am Spyder SE5 transmission, but here are some more technical details that set the Can-Am Spyder apart from other performance vehicles. Let's start with reverse. No self-respecting motorcycle has a reverse, especially one that touts itself as a cutting-edge performance machine

It is so cool... Just pull into any parking lot, pull on the reverse lever, push down another gear and back right into your spot. The SE5 version is even easier - push the "R" button and start backing up. Dang, I must be getting old! You have to remember, the Spyder Roadster weighs in at about 700 lbs so the reverse becomes a must-have feature.

The Spyder is belt driven with a carbon-reinforced drive belt. It has a wet clutch (operates inside the case with oil) via a hydraulic piston. The drive ratio is 28/79, but really, once you feather that clutch lever and leave a smoky patch of rubber in your neighbor's driveway, do you really care about drive ratio?

Let's Talk About The Backbone

With two wheels in front and one in the rear, you can only guess that the geometry of the Can-Am Spyder frame will be a bit unique compared to your average motorcycle or ATV. It all starts with what Can-Am calls the skeleton and the SST frame (Surrounding Spar Technology) featuring a steel center beam that surrounds the engine, minimizing weld points and increasing structural integrity. It is what they refer to as a Y design, which you also see utilized throughout all their marketing materials. 

Okay... Here Is The Tricky Stuff

Two wheels in the front, one in the rear... This thing must handle like Fred Flintstone's Brontosaurus. No! Even Wilma would be right at home peddling the Spyder through its paces. You see, the engineers at BRP have created what they call the VSS (Vehicle Stability System), a control system they developed in conjunction with Bosch (a German-based leader of technology - check them out on the web at www.bosch.com).

There are three parts to the VSS:

1- The Stability Control System (SCS) - which continually analyzes the motion of the vehicle and assists the rider in correcting any negative situation. The SCS individually brakes the wheels and reduces excess torque until rider control is regained. I found this to be an amazing feature that instantly develops confidence on how this machine will handle under adverse conditions.

2- The Traction Control System (TCS) - which optimizes rear wheel traction to prevent any excess rear wheel spin. Unless, of course, you are in that burn-out factor range where the designers allow you to spin the rear tire as long as you have the Spyder pointed straight.

3- Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS) - helps you maintain control of the vehicle while braking, no matter how quickly you need to come to a stop. Fred used to wear out the bottom of his feet but with the Spyder, sensors monitor the rotation of all three wheels independently and help the rider maintain control steer through any adverse situation.

And then there is the DPS (Dynamic Power Steering). The DPS provides a computer-programmed variable power assist that helps adjusts the amount of steering effort required according to your speed. Okay... That came right out of their marketing brochure, but I can tell you the SCS, TCS, ABS and DPS add up to a combined safety feature found only in high-end sports cars. You can push the Spyder through the turns and the on-board sensors will respond. Barney would be jealous.

What's Left?

To help prevent theft, there is the DESS (Digitally Encoded Security System). The vehicle will not start without the correctly coded key.

The Appearance: Sexy comes to mind. The Spyder has what Marc Lecroix, the Marketing Director for Can-Am Spyder, calls "Flowing Edge Design." The Spyder's appearance creates the impression that the vehicle is in motion, even at a stand-still.

Cargo: Just like the old VW bugs, the Spyder has a storage trunk in the front which allows you to carry 35 lbs of whatever you need to take to where ever you are going. Plenty of space for a week-long cruise.

Gas Mileage: If there was one area for improvement, it would be the gas mileage. You can expect somewhere between 30-35 mpg depending, of course, on how you ride it. Not bad really considering the fun factor you'll have getting there.

Warranty: Top to bottom. Front to rear. Soup to nuts. The Spyder comes with a 2-year warranty excluding only "wear" parts like the brakes and the rear tire you left all over your neighborhood.

Driver's License: just a standard car driver's license will suffice in the UK


Accessories: Can-Am has a complete catalog for accessorizing your Spyder. There are performance products like the exhaust and glamour parts like the six-spoke wheels and beauty rings. If you are into touring, there is an adjustable backrest for your passenger along with tank and tour bags and touring windshields. Can-Am even has a complete line of riding apparel and sportswear.

Who Should Buy One? If you are into quilting, save your money. If you are into high-performance, sensor-driven acceleration, don't want to be surrounded with metal cages, enjoy the wind in your face and the smell of rubber, then the Can Am Spyder might be for you.

What Would I Change? I would prefer a bit more forward footpeg position - but then again that's just my opinion after five knee surgeries. I can imagine a reduced version (about 10% in size) for around town that housed a 600cc motor and nurtured 50 to 60 mpg. And then I can imagine the Spyder with a 1200cc engine that would top out at 140 mph. One thing for sure, the design team at Can-Am are already way ahead when it comes to design conception. You can bet the Spyder will soon spin another web.

Conclusion A few hours on the Spyder will tell you it is a lot of fun and easy to ride, especially with the SE5 version. Our plan now is to take one for a long cruise. There is no better way to understand the pros and cons of a bike - or Roadster - than to spend some serious time with it. Stay tuned.

Oh yeah... I think both Fred and Barney would buy one.

 

CAN AM HISTORY

The Can Am Spyder Roadster is a three-wheeled motorcycle two wheels in the front, one in the rear.

The Can Am Spyder is manufactured by Bombardier Recreational Products, Inc . BRP's portfolio of brands and products includes: Ski-Doo and Lynx snowmobiles, Sea-Doo watercraft and sport boats, Evinrude outboard engines, Can-Am all-terrain vehicles and roadsters, and Rotax® engines and karts.

Vehicle History

1996

* At BRP’s Annual Design Forum in 1996, Denys Lapointe, BRP’s vice president of design and innovation, initiated the project.
* The rough sketch of what is today the Can Am Spyder roadster was chosen as the concept for BRP’s first on-road vehicle.

1998

* BRP presented a preliminary business case with the “P0” Spyder prototype to board members and key stakeholders at a private track in Georgia. It was then that BRP decided to invest in the prototype and dedicate full design, engineering and marketing resources to the project.

2006

* In December 2006, the first spy photo of the Can Am Spyder roadster was published online. The vehicle was spotted near Deal's Gap.

2007

* On February 9, 2007, BRP officially unveiled the Can Am Spyder roadster to dealers, customers and media.
* In September, the first full-production Spyder roadster rolled off the assembly line in Valcourt, Québec.
* In October, Spyder serial number 001 was delivered to Jay Leno by BRP executives at Leno’s garage in Burbank, Calif.

2008

* In September, BRP completed its North American Spyder roadster dealer expansion.
* In December, the Spyder Roadster was featured in an episode of CSI: Miami

The Can-Am Spyder Roadster features a Vehicle Stability System (VSS) designed in conjunction with Bosch. The VSS increases the rider’s stability and control. The system continuously analyzes the motion and forces as they relate to the Spyder’s stability and will intervene as necessary to assist the rider in keeping the vehicle under control. The Spyder’s VSS includes:

* Anti-lock Braking System
* Traction Control System
* Stability Control System with Roll-Over Mitigation

The Spyder Roadster's Dynamic Power Steering will vary power assistance based on speed, rider input, and road conditions.
The Digitally Encoded Security System is a proprietary anti-theft system found on BRP products.

 

Spyder SM5 The SM5 features a transmission similar to that of a traditional motorcycle, with a left-foot-actuated shifter and a left-hand-actuated clutch. It is a two-down-four-up system, with a transmission-based reverse as a sub-gear below first gear.

Spyder SE5 The SE5 Spyder roadster offers a semi-automatic transmission that allows the rider to up-shift and down-shift with the press of a button (thumb and index finger activated).


 

 
Phone The Jetworks Order Hot-Line: 01227 771 831
Unit 48-49 John wilsonbusiness park Whitstable Kent CT5 3QT
 
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